Archives: November 19, 2019

Last of the Summer Wine Characters Die within Weeks of Each Other

JULIETTE KAPLAN and JEAN FERGUSON RECENTLY DECEASED

JULIETTE KAPLAN, who played battleaxe Pearl Sibshaw in BBC sitcom Last of the Summer Wine for 25 years, has died at the age of 80, as per her agent.

Kaplan appeared in 226 episodes of the show from 1985 to 2010, with the sharp-tongued Pearl trying to thwart husband Howard’s attempts to have an affair.

Juliette also appeared in Coronation Street in 2015 as Agnes Tinker.

Barry Langford thanked “everyone who sent their love and support to this fearless and supremely gifted actress”

The sad news comes after her agent announced on 31 July that she was “gravely ill”, and described her as a “very brave lady”.

Last of the Summer Wine ran from 1973 to 2010, which took a comical look at the lives of some elderly people in a Yorkshire town.

JEAN FERGUSSON

Other co-stars have paid tribute to Last of the Summer Wine and Coronation Street actress Jean Fergusson after she has died aged 74.

Jean – described as the life and soul of any gathering – was best known for playing Marina in Last of the Summer Wine and Dorothy Hoyle in Coronation Street.

She has appeared in over than 200 episodes of the classic Last of the Summer Wine over 25 years, beginning in 1985, and was widely known for her character’s long-running comedy affair with ‘Howard’, who was played by Robert Fyfe.

She was said to have been ill when friends saw her a few days before her death.


The First Western Movie Ever Made Was Shot in Lancashire

The Great Train Robbery is considered to be the first western ever made.   WRONG -WRONG -WRONG
The movie that bears the distinction of being the first cowboy ever filmed was shot in 1903. It is twelve minute long and called “The Great Train Robbery”, a silent, was an immediate hit with the public and supposedly paved the way for scores of other films set in the mythical old west.
NOW HERE IS THE TRUTH

Forget Hollywood. The world’s first Western was shot in the countryside near Blackburn Lancashire, new research has suggested.

Kidnapping By Indians was filmed in 1899, 4 years before The Great Train Robbery, which until now was widely seen as the genre’s first film.

Artist Jamie Holman made the link to Lancashire in a study of records by the British Film Institute.

Mr Holman said the information, which showed a filming location close to Blackburn, was “hiding in plain sight”.

The one-minute film is due to be shown in a public screening Blackburn, which was once home to the pioneering film makers Mitchell and Kenyon.

Mr Holman, who has researched links between the cotton industry and film history, said: “Blackburn had links to the Wild West.

“Cotton workers had worked in the USA and they told stories of the wild frontier.

“Mitchell and Kenyon would have been aware of the appetite for the Wild West at the time. Many of the stereotypes are there: the head-dress; the tomahawks.”

This one-minute movie is due to be shown at a public screening in Blackburn, which was once home to film makers Mitchell and Kenyon.

Watch the film here  https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-kidnapping-by-indians-1899-1899-online